Frequently asked questions

What can I expect when I contact Southern D?

As ethical breeders, we care deeply about our puppies and want to be sure they will live in a suitable forever home.  We may ask questions about your home and work situation to determine if there will be adequate supervision for a young pup, and we will guide you in choosing the pup with the best temperament for you and for your family.  We will also provide written materials on feeding, care, and training of your Bulldog pup, and will welcome any questions you might have.  You can consider Southern D an ongoing source of advice and information for the life of your pup.

Does Southern D deliver?

Yes! We deliver on a case by case basis – throughout the state of Texas and throughout the United States. We offer safe, ethical shipping via Puppy kitty ipsum dolor sit good dog tigger good boy furry teeth purr lazy cat run fast fish critters string. Ferret walk toy kibble kitten cockatiel feeder fetch Rover maine coon cat speak harness whiskers mouse. Food bird food bark left paw vaccine litter water catch dinnertime food dragging. Dog cockatiel smooshy gimme five wagging tails.

Why are bulldogs so expensive?

There are a number of reasons, mainly the expenses we incur as breeders before we ever get a puppy on the ground.  These costs include fees for progesterone testing (upwards of $200-$400), stud fees ($850 – $1,000), semen collection/shipping ($250 – $300), semen implant (anywhere from $250 – $600+, depending on the type of implant procedure used), and surgical c-section ($650 – $1,500).  Add to that the additional cost of raising a litter for 8-12 weeks, which includes food, shots, worming, health checks, etc., and one can quickly see that breeding Bulldogs is an expensive endeavor.  In addition, most litters consist of only 3-4 puppies, of which we generally keep one or two. So, often, the remaining puppies that are placed in pet homes barely cover the cost of breeding, whelping and raising them.

Also, raising Bulldog pups requires a tremendous amount of “hands-on” time that many other breeds don’t require.  When Bulldog puppies are born, they cannot be left alone with their mothers, as the mom’s heavy body and shape means a greater risk of accidentally crushing a pup.  This requires us to bring the pups to the dam for supervised feedings every few hours, with intensive care the first 2-3 weeks after birth.  As you can imagine, this is a 24/7 commitment for many, many weeks.

Why are Bulldogs bred using artificial insemination and whelped with c-sections?

Bulldogs are typically bred through artificial insemination or surgical implant.  They can and do mate naturally, but the implant practice is mainly done to utilize stud dogs that are not available locally, to reduce risk of any type of infection that might be passed between the stud and female, to reduce injury to the stud dog, and to more accurately pinpoint the exact date of birth.  With advances in veterinary medicine, we now have access to stud dogs from all over the US, or even in other countries, via shipped semen.  Semen is collected, then shipped in a chilled or frozen state.  In either case, a surgical implant must be used due to the reduced longevity of the sperm when chilled or frozen.  Also, the use of AI helps increase genetic diversity, a plus for any breed.  Over the past 20+ years or so, the AI practice has become very common for many different dog breeds, as Breeders recognize the importance of genetic diversity and protecting the health of their valuable stud dogs.  AI requires no actual physical contact between the animals, thus drastically reducing the incidence of disease that could be spread through traditional copulation methods.

As for c-sections, the common thought is that due to their characteristic physique, with broad shoulders and a small pelvis, it can be difficult for Bulldogs to whelp puppies naturally.   Yes, this can be a problem, but the bigger reason is the threat of Anasarca or Water pups.  These puppies have excess water in the tissues and organs and are abnormally large and cannot pass through the birth canal.  If they get stuck, the life of that pup, the mother, and any remaining puppies are at great risk.  Presently, there is no known reason for this condition.  We cannot say it is hereditary or caused by diet or environment, but there are ongoing research studies hoping to find the cause and a cure.  Anasarca pups don’t happen often, but it is a very real threat which gives conscientious breeders reason to err on the side of caution and utilize c-sections to reduce the incidence of mortality.  The potential loss of an important female to a breeding program is just too great a risk.

Breeding Bulldogs necessitates training and experience.  Sadly, we hear many tragic stories of inexperienced breeders who lose entire litters and the dam because they don’t have the experience, resources or knowledge to safely breed them.

I don’t want to show so why are papers important?  

In recent years, an alarming trend has cropped up in the way of “Rare Colored” Bulldogs.  The BCA Written Breed Standard defines what a Bulldog should look like. It was written nearly 150 years ago and has undergone very few changes since its inception. It definitively states the preferred and acceptable colors a
Bulldog should be, in this order of preference:

1)  Red Brindle, 2) All Other Brindles, 3) Solid White,  4) Solid Red, Fawn or Fallow, and 5) Piebald (mostly white with some patches of the aforementioned colors).  The color should be pure and brilliant.

“Off Colored”or “Rare Colored” Bulldogs are marketed solely for money.  They are listed as Black, Blue, Lilac, Chocolate, Black/Tan, Black/White, Black or Blue Tri-colored,etc.  Any color other than those listed in the BCA Written Standard is NOT CORRECT.  The breeders of such dogs ony take color into consideration when breeding and disregard nearly all other aspects that are important to breeding healthy, quality, emotionally stable dogs.  And they charge upwards of $5,000, $10,000, and $15,000 or more!!  Don’t be fooled by these unscrupulous breeders!  Their sole purpose is to extract as much money
as they can from naive puppy buyers thinking they are buying something “special”.  There is nothing special about these colors.  They are WRONG.  They are NOT correct Bulldog colors.

I don’t want to show so why are papers important?  

Valid AKC papers show that your dog is of pure ancestry, proof that your dog is 100% Bulldog.

In the United States, the two main dog registries are the American Kennel Club (AKC) and the United Kennel Club (UKC).  Other prominent registries you might come across are the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) and the Kennel Club of England (The KC).  If your dog is not registered with one of these, the papers are likely worthless.

Here in the US, if a “purebred” dog does not have AKC papers, it is generally a sign that something is wrong.  While AKC papers do not ensure a dog is of quality stock, the lack of papers should be a warning.  Usually, these dogs result from dams and/or sires that were sold as pets without breeding rights.  (The dam or sire’s original breeder thought the dog had a fault or deviation from the breed standard and did not wish the dog to be bred, sold the dog as a pet with Limited AKC registration.  The new owner bred the dog anyway, but the puppies could not be registered with AKC as both parents must themselves have been AKC registered.)  In other cases, the dogs could actually be a cross-breed, or imported from another country, or dogs from breeders who have lost their AKC privileges for ethical violations (suspended or revoked).  Suspect registries include the Continental Kennel Club (CKC – not to be confused with the legitimate Canadian Kennel Club), International Olde English Bulldog Association (IOEBA), American Bully Breeders Association  (ABBA), Dog Registry of America (DRA), and North American Purebred Registry (NAPR).  To name but a few

What is  rare colored bulldog?  

In recent years, an alarming trend has cropped up in the way of “Rare Colored” Bulldogs.  The BCA Written Breed Standard defines what a Bulldog should look like. It was written nearly 150 years ago and has undergone very few changes since its inception. It definitively states the preferred and acceptable colors a
Bulldog should be, in this order of preference:

1)  Red Brindle, 2) All Other Brindles, 3) Solid White,  4) Solid Red, Fawn or Fallow, and 5) Piebald (mostly white with some patches of the aforementioned colors).  The color should be pure and brilliant.

“Off Colored”or “Rare Colored” Bulldogs are marketed solely for money.  They are listed as Black, Blue, Lilac, Chocolate, Black/Tan, Black/White, Black or Blue Tri-colored,etc.  Any color other than those listed in the BCA Written Standard is NOT CORRECT.  The breeders of such dogs ony take color into consideration when breeding and disregard nearly all other aspects that are important to breeding healthy, quality, emotionally stable dogs.  And they charge upwards of $5,000, $10,000, and $15,000 or more!!  Don’t be fooled by these unscrupulous breeders!  Their sole purpose is to extract as much money
as they can from naive puppy buyers thinking they are buying something “special”.  There is nothing special about these colors.  They are WRONG.  They are NOT correct Bulldog colors.

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Contact

Phone

214.802.0095

Mail

info@southerndbulldogs.com

Address

4635 Barstow Blvd.
Dallas, Texas 75236